Pinon Bread (Pi,non)

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Title: Pinon Bread (Pi,non)
Yield: 12 Servings
Categories: Bakery, Ethnic/regi

Ingredients:

1 c Pine nuts
1 1/4 oz Active dry yeast;
-(one-package)
1/2 ts Sugar
1 c Warm water
1 ts Salt
1 c Whole wheat flour
2 c Unbleached white flour; or
-more
2 tb Cornmeal; for the peel
1 ts Chili powder; New Mexican
-(preferable freshly ground
-red chili)


"There's a generous cupful of toasted, ground pine nuts in this bread,
enough so that their unusual pine flavor is clearly present. This bread
makes a delicate, nutty-flavored toast, and the dough can also be shaped
into rolls and glazed. I sometimes add a little wild sage, which is very
aromatic and right with the pine nuts, but if you decide to add sage that
is unfamiliar to you, test it out first in a piece of extra dough. Some
sages can be intensely bitter as well as aromatic.

"Pure red chili mixed with water and brushed over the dough before baking
gives a beautiful warm reddish color to the bread. Where vent lines have
been cut the dough bakes golden brown, and the whole thing looks like a big
gourd or pumpkin. I prefer to bake this round bread on a baking stone,
allowing it to rise on a wooden peel dusted with cornmeal. But if you
choose to use a bread pan use one suitable for a loaf weighing 1+1/2
pounds.

"Served with the Anasazi Beans with Juniper (SAVORY WAY, page 267) and the
Wild Green Salad (SAVORY WAY, page 44) this makes a simple southwestern
meal filled with strong, clean tastes. Makes 1 large loaf or a dozen
2-ounce rolls. " -DM

Toast the pine nuts in a dry skillet until they begin to color, shaking the
pan occasionally so that they don't burn. Remove them from the heat and set
aside to cool; then chop them finely by hand or in a food processor to make
a fine meal. (Be careful not to overwork them, or the pine nuts will form a
nut butter.)

Stir the yeast and sugar into the warm water and set the mixture aside for
10 minutes or until the surface is covered with bubbles. Stir in the salt,
ground nuts, whole wheat flour, and as much white flour as you can, using a
spoon. Turn the dough out onto the counter and knead it until it's smooth
and silky, about 8 minutes, incorporating extra flour as needed.

Brush a film of oil in a bowl and set the dough in to rise for
approximately 45 minutes, covered with a damp towel or a piece of plastic
wrap. Let it double in bulk, then turn it out on a counter and knead it
briefly. Shape the dough into a round ball and set it aside to rise again
on a peel or counter dusted with cornmeal or flour. While it is rising,
preheat the oven to 375 deg F. If you're using a baking stone, heat it at
the same time.

When the bread has risen again, after 30 minutes or so, cut 4 or 5 deep
slashes across the top. Mix the ground chili with a few spoonfuls of water
and paint it over the surface of the bread. Slide the risen bread onto the
baking stone and bake it until it's firm on top and lightly browned on the
unglazed parts, about 40 minutes. Set the bread on a rack to cool.

PINON ROLLS -- After the dough has risen the first time, knead it briefly
and then cut it into 12 2-ounce pieces. Form each piece into a ball and set
them aside to rise on a peel or baking pan dusted with flour or cornmeal.
Cut several vent lines into each roll and brush the rolls with chili water
as above. When risen, bake the rolls until lightly browned and firm to the
touch, about 25 minutes.

~-SENT TO the EAT-LF list 9/6/97 by patHanneman Per 2oz Serving: 178 cals,
5.8 g fat, 27.5%

Posted to Digest eat-lf.v097.n224 by KitPATh on
Sep 06, 1997